ABC skips the full picture of inflation raising prices for Thanksgiving

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In late October, ABC’s World news tonight Spend 16 seconds teasing how the price for your Thanksgiving dinner would rise in anticipation of the fuller picture that would unfold as the holidays approached. But with the price of turkey rising 20 percent, other meats up 11.9 percent and feed 50 percent, ABC was now there to be seen while CBS Evening News on Monday he was visiting a turkey farm and NBC night news he was chatting with the president of a grocery chain.

“For the index, tonight is what will be a more expensive Thanksgiving this year,” ABC presenter David Muir announced on Oct. 26. “Economists are pointing to shortages of supplies, transportation and labor. Every part of the dinner should cost more from turkey to dessert. Prices for meat, poultry, fish and eggs have increased 10% in some places compared to last year.”

While Muir hasn’t raised the cost of Thanksgiving since, CBS anchor Norah O’Donnell went to a turkey farm in Maryland and declared it the most expensive Thanksgiving ever:

O’DONNELL: How much has the cost of feed increased?

CHRIS BOHER (farmer): It almost doubled.

O’DONNELL: Rising costs make that bird on your family’s table an expensive holiday gift.

Will this be the most expensive Thanksgiving ever?

BOHER: I guess up to this point, it probably will be.

Chris Boher is a third generation farmer and has had to raise his retail prices by 15%. “And that’s just the turkey,” O’Donnell noted. “The overall price of groceries, including Thanksgiving favorites like sweet potatoes, cranberry sauce and pumpkin pie, has increased by 5.4% over the past year. For poultry, meat, eggs and fish, it’s even more. high, an increase of nearly 12% “.

And according to Boher, everything from “feed, fuel, work – all of these things went up in price from 2020 to 2021”. He also explained that he buys “10 to 20,000 gallons” of fuel per year. “When you do it in those numbers, the price of diesel is now twice as high as last year,” he added.

NBC made progress on Monday, sympathizing with viewers struggling to make ends meet with inflation putting them under pressure after business correspondent Stephanie Ruhle spent Sunday stating that “dirty little secret“It was that Americans could afford inflation well.

They left it to trade and tech correspondent Jo Ling Kent to mend ties with their audience on Monday.

“For the millions who gathered for the first Thanksgiving in person in two years, be prepared to pay thanks to a labor shortage in the supply chain. The retail price of turkeys is up to nine cents a pound from last year. The other reason? The higher cost of corn to feed those turkeys and inflation, “he said.

But while he noted that other Thanksgiving staples such as cranberry sauce and packaged sandwiches would also be more expensive, he spoke to Scott McClelland, the president of HEB Food and Drug Stores, who seemed to suggest prices were rising because ” perceived deficiencies. “

Clearly, NBC still has some work to do to get it back to reality.

ABC’s omission of people struggling to make ends meet and celebrate Thanksgiving was made possible thanks to lucrative sponsorships of Sunrise Other WeatherTech. Their contact information is linked so you can tell them about the biased news they fund.

The transcript is below, click “expand” to read:

CBS Evening News
November 15, 2021
18:44:06 oriental

NORAH O’DONNELL: Okay, now we want to move on to the skyrocketing cost of your Thanksgiving party, from turkey to toppings. So, we visited a farm in Maryland to find out why the prices are so high this year.

[Cuts to video]

The glow of the morning light floods the Maryland farmlands, where Chris Bohrer is raising a flock of all-natural turkeys. And it’s time for an expensive breakfast.

How much has the cost of feed increased?

CHRIS BOHER: It almost doubled.

O’DONNELL: Rising costs make that bird on your family’s table an expensive holiday gift.

Will this be the most expensive Thanksgiving ever?

BOHER: I guess up to this point, it probably will be.

O’DONNELL: How much did you raise the price of your turkeys?

BOHER: Our retail prices have risen by nearly 15 percent.

O’DONNELL: And that’s just the turkey. The overall price of groceries, including Thanksgiving favorites like sweet potatoes, cranberry sauce, and pumpkin pie, has increased 5.4% over the past year. For poultry, meat, eggs and fish, it’s even higher, an increase of nearly 12%.

Why is the price of Turkey going up?

BOHER: Everything we buy today costs more – feed, fuel, labor – all of these things have gone up in price from 2020 to 2021.

O’DONNELL: Boher has 20,000 free range turkeys. His days are long and it takes heavy equipment to get the job done.

Cost of fuel, how does it impact your business?

BOHER: Now go to the gas station and fill up, maybe 10-15 gallons of fuel. We buy 10 to 20,000 gallons of fuel per year. If you do it with those numbers, the price of diesel is now twice as high as last year.

[Transition]

O’DONNELL: You have to pass the cost on to the consumer.

BOHER: Or it costs us to eat some.

[Transition]

O’DONNELL: Once you raise prices, do you ever see them go down?

BOHER: There is a possibility. It’s very rare. Most companies won’t lower their prices after they’ve already raised them.

O’DONNELL: Last year, when COVID spread across America, Boher continued his business by breeding smaller birds.

BOHER: We saw how the pandemic was affecting consumers, realizing they weren’t going to have big rallies. Last year we raised smaller turkeys.

O’DONNELL: What size of turkeys do you raise this year?

BOHER: Not so many little turkeys. Some people still want a smaller turkey. But with families having larger reunions, we want to make sure we have those too.

O’DONNELL: Chris Bohrer is the third generation of his family to work on this farm and, yes, those birds are part of the family.

BOHER: I tell people, you know, if you feed a family of four, the cost of feeding that family has increased from last November to this November. I’m feeding a family of 20,000.

O’DONNELL: And get this, to feed those turkeys, it takes three pounds of feed for a turkey to only gain one pound. Learned that new.

NBC night news
November 15, 2021
19:16:40 Eastern

LESTER HOLT: Now let’s move on to the price you pay. Could this year’s Thanksgiving dinner be the most expensive ever for your family? Jo Ling Kent with some ways to save.

[Cuts to video]

JO LING KENT: For the millions of people who gathered for the first Thanksgiving in person in two years, be prepared to pay thanks to a labor shortage in the supply chain. The retail price of turkeys is up to nine cents a pound compared to last year. The other reason? The higher cost of corn to feed those turkeys and inflation.

SCOTT MCCLELLAND (HEB Food and Drug Stores, President): What we’re finding is that people in anticipation of a perceived shortage are rushing to buy turkeys now. Our turkey sales are up 100% from the same week a year ago last week.

KENT: The HEB supermarket chain says customers should be flexible.

What can buyers expect in the event of a reduced or delayed supply?

MCCLELLAND: I think one of the areas we’re seeing right now is in the pumpkin pie mix is ​​that it’s not that we don’t have it, but we may find that the shipping from the manufacturer to our stores is a day or two behind. . But on the other hand, there will likely be six or seven other brands to choose from.

KENT: Cranberry sauce is more expensive because it is more expensive to make steel cans and transportation costs have gone up. Packaged dinner rolls are more expensive because the price of some ingredients has gone up. Bakeries like Republic of Pie ordered their flour months ago and were still forced to raise their prices by $ 1.75 per pie.

JERAMI MONREAL (Repubblica di Pie, general manager): Of course we had to raise the price a bit. We go up incrementally as much as possible without trying to shake and agitate the restaurant and our customers.

KENT: Cake boxes are also in short supply.

MONREAL: I’m told they won’t have them for the rest of the month.

KENT: To stay on budget and get what you need, experts say buy frozen options and generic brands. And if you’re partying as a group, you really share the cost. Don’t leave the host alone on thorns. Jo Ling Kent, NBC News, North Hollywood, California.

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