Big winners of politicians in the new campaign money law

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Big winners of politicians in the new campaign money law


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KANU president and presidential hope Gideon Moi addresses supporters in the city of Kericho on October 23, 2021. PHOTO | VITALIS KIMUTAI | NMG

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Summary

  • Candidates for elective seats, including the presidency, will not be required to issue receipts and keep records for contributions received to their polling boxes if MPs approve a new bill.
  • The bill comes a month after lawmakers rejected a move by the Independent Electoral and Borders Commission (IEBC) to impose spending limits on campaigns for various elected seats.

Candidates for elective seats, including the presidency, will not be required to issue receipts and keep records for contributions received to their polling boxes if MPs approve a new bill.

The Electoral Campaign Act (Amendment), 2021 aims to remove the current requirement in which candidates and political parties who receive contributions issue a receipt for any contribution greater than Sh20,000.

The bill also removes the current requirement imposed on candidates, political parties or an authorized person seeking to raise funds from harambee to keep a record of the specific details of the fundraiser, including the location, date, organizer of the fundraiser. harambee and total contributions.

“The bill, sponsored by Ndaragwa MP Jeremiah Kioni, seeks to amend sections 16 (1) and (2) of the law to remove the requirement to issue receipts and record keeping.

“A candidate, political party or referendum committee must disclose the amount and source of campaign contributions received for a nomination, election or referendum or case.

“A candidate, political party or referendum committee that does not disclose funds or donations as required by this law, commits an opening,” says the bill, which was formally presented to the National Assembly.

The bill comes a month after lawmakers rejected a move by the Independent Electoral and Borders Commission (IEBC) to impose spending limits on campaigns for various elected seats.

The bill follows Parliament’s decision last month to reject spending limits set by the Independent Electoral and Borders Commission (IEBC).

The House rejected IEBC regulations which sought to limit the amount of money candidates can splash in 2022 polls.

The House said the electoral agency was in time to submit the draft financial regulation for the 2020 election campaign.

The regulations sought to impose a ceiling and regulate the amount of money a political party or candidate can spend on elections or referendum campaigns.

In the proposed regulations, the IEBC had limited presidential election funding to 4.4 billion shillings, governors, senators and women’s representatives were limited to 433 million shillings, while MPs were allowed to spend a maximum of 33, 4 million shillings.

The IEBC is required, under Section 5 of the Election Campaign Financing Act 2013, to establish rules, which must be submitted to Parliament for approval at least 12 months before the general election.

Kenya goes to general elections on 9 August 2022. The draft financial regulation for the 2020 election campaign must have been approved by 9 August 2021.

The rules seek to provide for the regulation, spending and accountability of funds during elections and referendum campaigns.

The commission was also required to set the limit of contributions that a candidate, political party or referendum committee can receive from a single source, the limit of a loan they can receive and the limit of media coverage.

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