The numbers of the coronavirus are pointing in the right direction, but the risks of the new variants and Super Bowl rallies are hidden

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Downhill rental: Millions of renters who lost revenue during the pandemic have exhausted their savings or amassed a large credit card debt to pay their rent.Although temporarily bailed out of eviction moratoriums, they face overdue payments that may never be in. able to satisfy, Conor Dougherty relationships in the New York Times. Housing instability, a big problem before the pandemic, has gotten much worse. Even before last year, an estimated 11 million households – one in four tenants in the United States – spent more than half of their pre-tax income on housing, with overcrowding on the rise as many families moved in together, writes. Dougherty. Moody’s Analytics estimated that tenants who lost their jobs due to the pandemic since January had accumulated $ 53 billion in debt for arrears of rent, utilities and late fees. Some help has arrived: In one of his first acts after taking office, President Biden extended an expiring moratorium on evictions by two months, and soon $ 25 billion in federal royalties approved in December will be distributed, helping the tenants and landlords alike.

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Despair in Mexico: With the third highest Covid death toll in the world after the United States and Brazil, Mexico faces shortages of oxygen cylinders and vaccines and a devastated economy. reports from the Los Angeles Times, although deaths and infections continue to rise. About 167,000 Mexicans have died from the virus, and January has been the deadliest month so far, with nearly 33,000 deaths, according to official numbers, which are widely considered underestimated due to the severe lack of testing for the virus, the Times writes. Mexico was expected to receive about 400,000 doses of the vaccine per week through March, but Pfizer cut back, citing rising global demand. By last weekend, the country of 126 million people had only administered 711,000 doses. At least 2,850 health workers have died, in part due to a lack of sufficient protective equipment, many doctors and nurses say. “It feels like a horror movie that never ends,” said Evelyn Beltrán, 39, a nurse in the city of Puebla. “What a terrible sense of despair and despair.”

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Prison tops the list: Since last summer, California’s Occupational Safety Agency Cal / OSHA has quoted more than 130 employers for failing to adequately protect workers from Covid-19. Topping the list is San Quentin State Prison, which saw 2,200 confirmed cases and the deaths of 28 inmates and a correctional officer. according to the Los Angeles Times. Now the prison is facing the single largest proposed penalty for Covid-related violations, $ 421,880, Cal / OSHA says. The prison was cited for failing to provide staff with adequate training and equipment to work with infected individuals, along with other violations. The agency has also targeted restaurants, retailers and healthcare facilities in recent weeks, including three Kaiser Permanente medical centers in the cities of San Leandro, Antioch and Walnut Creek.

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Selective selections: For at least a decade, the U.S. Department of Education has called on a disproportionate number of college students from the Black and Latino neighborhoods to provide additional evidence that the information on their financial aid applications is accurate. an analysis of federal data from the Washington Post found. Data verification requests are meant to reduce fraud and improper payments, but audits can be time-consuming and mostly fall on low-income students, according to The Post. The Department of Education would not have shared its methodology, but said it uses machine learning to target candidates with the highest probability of errors. Experts said applicants who qualify for the most federal grants are more often selected. Elder Jesse Amankwaah of the University of Richmond, a 21-year-old political science student, told The Post that he has been selected for verification almost every year, even though the award amount remains the same. “Be selected once, ok. But three times? It started to seem like they didn’t trust me, like they thought I was lying, ”Amankwaah said.

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In “Cancer Alley”: With Louisiana preparing for an influx of heavy industrial operations along a stretch of the Mississippi River that some call “Cancer Alley,” environmental officials must do a better job of cracking down on air pollution violations, a state audit He says. According to ProPublica, many of the audit findings followed those of a 2019 joint investigation by The Times Picayune, The Advocate and ProPublica, which showed that emissions of carcinogenic chemicals from large industries along lower Mississippi increased the risks for health for mainly black and low-income people who live closest to plants.

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Gorging on guns: January was the third highest month on record for arms sales, as Americans bought 2.19 million arms, up 79% from January 2020, according to The track. Three of the busiest five weeks for the FBI’s gun background checks occurred after the January 6 invasion of the Capitol.

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Better economies, better air?: Regions with fast economic growth often see spikes in air pollution. But a new study Air Quality Report in Africa notes that in the northern part of sub-Saharan Africa, levels of dangerous nitrogen oxides are decreasing even as wealth and population increase, The New York Times relationships. The reason is that an increase in industrial and transport pollution in the study area – from Senegal and Ivory Coast in the west to South Sudan, Uganda and Kenya in the east – appears to be more than offset by a decrease in fires started by farmers to clear the land in preparation for planting.

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