Will the Trump administration’s Snafus test for coronavirus be their political version of the Democrats’ catastrophic launch of Obamacare?

0
15

While I’ve seen the Trump administration fumbling with the ball to make mass coronavirus testing available to communities, it comes to mind how the Obama administration fumbled their ball during the 2013 Obamacare launch:

  • Repeated statements about how things were going in the face of facts that did not fit their rhetoric.
  • Not having control over what could go wrong and what went wrong from start to finish.
  • Delays that have led to public distrust of the administration.

The difference this time around is that the Obamacare fiasco has finally been brought under control and, while people who have not been able to take out their health insurance for a few weeks was no small deal, it was not the life scenario. or death we are facing today.

Epidemiologists tell us that to keep the coronavirus under control, we need to quickly know who is sick, where they are sick and where they got it.

US health officials were hindered from the start because tests were not readily available.

And they may not be readily available at the community health center level for weeks to come.

There has been one Trump administration mess after another – and no, this is not the fault of a president who left office more than three years ago:

  • The first test kits were defective.
  • There were never enough test kits to go around.
  • Health authorities only tested a very small portion of the population, mainly those who already had symptoms, or who had been to China or had been exposed to a known carrier.
  • As a result, local health officials have been working largely blindly against a virus that can take two weeks to show outward symptoms, meanwhile people with the virus have been circulating in their communities for weeks.

Trump’s public denial of the problem reminded me of then HHS Secretary Sebelius telling us that the Obamacare membership system worked fine when it actually didn’t work at all. test, get a test. They’re there. They have the tests. And the tests are beautiful. “

Finally, this week, after giving the virus more than a month to spread far and wide, major labs are starting to ramp up.

But, two months after it became clear that the planet was on the verge of a pandemic, community health centers, the backbone of health care in many communities, still can’t test why, get this, the computer system isn’t working. !

As reported in Washington Post, according to Ron Yee, medical director of the National Association of Community Health Centers, “The billing codes are not yet in the electronic health records, so medical professionals have not sorted them. [coronavirus tests] still. “

The 1,400 community health centers in the United States serve about one in twelve Americans. There are a lot of people who walk around coughing and sneezing and they can’t be tested.

To date, only 5,000 Americans have been tested.

By comparison, the Associated Press reports that both South Korea and Germany are currently capable of running 15,000 tests one day.

President Trump and his elders can argue that things like the effectiveness of the first coronavirus test kits are not something you should have expected to know about, just as the Obama people have argued the same about the problem with the Obamacare computer system.

But it is the job of a senior manager, in the face of something as important as the launch of Obamacare, and certainly in the face of clear signs in early January that a crisis was brewing, to launch a top-down review. and try how things would work out.

The first question a good manager asks is: what could go wrong?

The biggest difference between the Obama administration’s launch of Obamacare and this is that there is no evidence that the Obama administration killed anyone in 2013.

If this was 2016 and Trump was a candidate running against the Democrats, can you imagine what he would be tweeting about it?

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here